LG Gram 17 (2020) review

When you pick up a 17-inch laptop like the LG Gram 17, you’re likely expecting a device that is packing the most powerful hardware on the market, while simultaneously being big, bulky and heavy. Well, what if we told you that none of that is true about the LG Gram 17?

If you want to get your hands on the LG Gram 17, it’ll set you back $1,749 (£1,549, about AU$2,450). For a 17-inch laptop with a Core i7 processor, 16GB of RAM and 1TB of SSD storage – not to mention the 1,600p display, that’s actually quite a bargain. Comparitively, the HP Envy 17 is cheaper at $1,399 (about £1,070, AU$1,960) but that’s with single-channel RAM with its closes hardware configuration, and a much heavier 6.02 lb build – twice the weight of the LG Gram 17.

The laptop is packed with a top-end Intel Core i7-1065G7, but it’s configured down to a 15W TDP, down from the 25W that you’ll find in some more powerful configurations. To further hamper the maximum performance of this processor, LG has a pretty lightweight cooling solution on hand, which stops it from boosting quite as high as something like the Surface Book 3, which has the same processor at the same TDP, but is 28% faster in Cinebench R20. However, the Surface Book 3 is much heavier. 

The LG Gram 17 weighs just 2.98 lbs and is just 0.7 inches thick, making it the most portable 17-inch laptop we’ve ever used. Just for comparison’s sake, the Surface Book 3 we just mentioned is a 15-inch device and weighs more at 3.35lbs. Even the Dell XPS 15, which is a laptop we would love to carry around everywhere we go weighs more at 4.5lb. 

So, basically, if you’re looking for a laptop with a huge display and a numpad that you can easily carry around everywhere without weighing you down, the LG Gram 17 should be near the top of your list. 

The laptop even has a wide selection of ports, which makes it excellent for working on the go. On the left-hand side of the laptop, you’re getting a charging port, a USB-A, an HDMI-out and USB-C, which can also be used for charging. On the opposite side, you get MicroSD, two more USB-A ports and a lock. In a laptop this thin and light, the LG Gram 17 provides such a wealth of ports that we just can’t help but wonder why everyone else keeps opting for just USB-C these days. 

However, the thin and light design does have one critical drawback – durability. The keyboard deck and screen have a bit too much flex to give us much confidence in its ability to survive any kind of trauma. LG does claim that the magnesium-alloy chassis has passe 7 MIL-STD durability tests, but it’s definitely a device that you don’t want to subject to much bending or drops. 

Despite the flexibility of the keyboard deck, typing on this laptop is an absolute dream come true. The LG Gram 17 keyboard is a pretty standard chiclet setup, but the keys have just the right amount of travel that typing is quiet and comfortable, without messing with our accuracy. Plus, there are more and more large laptops coming out that are doing away with numpads, and having one here is a dream come true, especially because it doesn’t really make the rest of the keyboard feel cramped – again because of the sheer size of the device. 

The touchpad gets the job done, too, and is honestly one of the better Windows trackpads we’ve used. It’s still not quite as good as the trackpad on something like the Razer Blade 15 or a MacBook, but it’s far from the worst, and gestures and tracking is nice and accurate. 

The LG Gram 17 weighs just 2.98 lbs and is just 0.7 inches thick, making it the most portable 17-inch laptop we’ve ever used. Just for comparison’s sake, the Surface Book 3 we just mentioned is a 15-inch device and weighs more at 3.35lbs. Even the Dell XPS 15, which is a laptop we would love to carry around everywhere we go weighs more at 4.5lb. 

So, basically, if you’re looking for a laptop with a huge display and a numpad that you can easily carry around everywhere without weighing you down, the LG Gram 17 should be near the top of your list. 

The laptop even has a wide selection of ports, which makes it excellent for working on the go. On the left-hand side of the laptop, you’re getting a charging port, a USB-A, an HDMI-out and USB-C, which can also be used for charging. On the opposite side, you get MicroSD, two more USB-A ports and a lock. In a laptop this thin and light, the LG Gram 17 provides such a wealth of ports that we just can’t help but wonder why everyone else keeps opting for just USB-C these days. 

However, the thin and light design does have one critical drawback – durability. The keyboard deck and screen have a bit too much flex to give us much confidence in its ability to survive any kind of trauma. LG does claim that the magnesium-alloy chassis has passe 7 MIL-STD durability tests, but it’s definitely a device that you don’t want to subject to much bending or drops. 

Despite the flexibility of the keyboard deck, typing on this laptop is an absolute dream come true. The LG Gram 17 keyboard is a pretty standard chiclet setup, but the keys have just the right amount of travel that typing is quiet and comfortable, without messing with our accuracy. Plus, there are more and more large laptops coming out that are doing away with numpads, and having one here is a dream come true, especially because it doesn’t really make the rest of the keyboard feel cramped – again because of the sheer size of the device. 

The touchpad gets the job done, too, and is honestly one of the better Windows trackpads we’ve used. It’s still not quite as good as the trackpad on something like the Razer Blade 15 or a MacBook, but it’s far from the worst, and gestures and tracking is nice and accurate. 

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