AVIV Takes Her Artistry To The Next Level With Confessional “You Feel Like Depression”

At 15, most teenagers are easing into high school, looking for their first part-time job, or squeezing in as much time with friends as possible as the threat of long-distance college friendships looms. But if you’re AVIV, you’re carving out a position in the spotlight on your own terms. The Toronto artist’s latest single, “You Feel Like Depression,” is a poignant call-out to someone who hurt her in a relationship, reminiscent of the angst of Olivia Rodrigo’s “drivers license” with a punk-influenced twist.

“It’s been strange and exhilarating in equal measure,” AVIV tells TREMG. “‘You Feel Like Depression,’ in particular, was a song that had been in the works for a long time before it was released. It went through months of changes and various variations before arriving at its current state. As a result, it’s strange that it’s now out there, but I’m ecstatic with how it turned out.”

“You Feel Like Depression” boasts production and a co-writing credit from Rian Lewis, a musical extraordinaire whose catalog includes work on Doja Cat’s “Streets,” Sister’s “Love Me Right,” and Ryan Woods’ “Bad Texter.” With a balance of pop smashes and underground slow-burns, he’s the perfect option for such an ambitious young artist who already knows her voice so well.

“Rian is so humble and polite that it’s easy to overlook his impressive resume,” AVIV admits. “I never felt intimidated around him since he treats every project with the same love and cares, regardless matter how big or little it is. He exemplifies someone who, although being well qualified for one, has no ego.”

AVIV has been a music lover for as long as she can remember, spending her weekends growing up visiting record stores with her family and browsing albums by artists like Fleetwood Mac and Radiohead. At just six, she began piano lessons and later learned to play guitar. But her artistry truly took off during the COVID-19 pandemic, when she started listening to and writing music more than ever. 

“The first time we were locked down was when I started composing songs and writing music,” she explains. “On the first day of the shutdown, I received a keyboard for my birthday, which I would essentially abuse for the next few months. I had written over a dozen by the time things calmed down, and I had fallen in love with a couple of them.”

Once you listen to her work, you’ll be falling in love with more than a couple of her songs. One example is her airy track “Black Coffee,” which got recognition from Spotify and a remix from OCTAVIO The Dweeb that marked her debut with Photo Finish Records.

AVIV’s unique take on alt-pop and indie-rock draws you into a world full of thoughtful lyrics and stories she’s carefully crafted to make as immersive as possible. She cites Lana Del Rey’s Blue Banisters album – full of personal details and hazy atmospheres – as a major inspiration for her most recent work. Like Del Rey, she’s unapologetically raw in her lyrics, no matter how polished the production is. And as impressive as the production can be, what really blows listeners away is her personal perspective on universal experiences.

You can find “You Feel Like Depression” on your favorite streaming services now, and get to know AVIV on Instagram, TikTok, and Twitter! Keep reading for more from our interview with the rising young singer-songwriter.


Congrats on your new single, “You Feel Like Depression!” How does it feel to finally let the song out into the world?

Thank you very much! It’s been strange and exhilarating in equal measure. “You Feel Like Depression,” in particular, was a song that had been in the works for a long time before it was released. It went through months of changes and various variations before arriving at its current state. As a result, it’s strange that it’s now out there, but I’m ecstatic with how it turned out.

Is there a certain lyric from “You Feel Like Depression” that you’re particularly proud of?

“You make the word love seem like depression,” the title lyric of the song, would have to be my favorite. It was difficult to pinpoint how to put the song’s betrayal and remorse into lyrics, and I believe this phrase did a good job of capturing it in the way I desired.

You co-produced the song with Rian Lewis, who has previously worked with artists like Kiiara and Doja Cat. Was it intimidating to work with him knowing he has credits with such big names?

Rian is so humble and polite that it’s easy to overlook his impressive resume. I never felt intimidated around him since he treats every project with the same love and cares, regardless matter how big or little it is. He exemplifies someone who, although being well qualified for one, has no ego.

Growing up, you went to record stores with your family every weekend and listened to artists like Fleetwood Mac. When did you start seeing music as more than just a hobby or a family activity and more like something you could use as an outlet?

The first time we were locked down was when I started composing songs and writing music. On the first day of the shutdown, I received a keyboard for my birthday, which I would essentially abuse for the next few months. I had written over a dozen by the time things calmed down, and I had fallen in love with a couple of them. This resulted in production and release.

You call Lana Del Rey, and Lorde your “moms,” which is pretty relatable. Is there a certain song by each of them that has particularly influenced your work?

The new Lana Del Rey album Blue Banisters has had a big effect on my latest songs. She has such a distinct way of stating things, especially in the lyrics which I get inspired from. 

Something that sticks out to me about your production style is that while it stands out on its own, it’s really tailored to your voice and the story you want to tell in each song. Once you’ve written a song, how do you go about planning the production?

Thank you very much! I’ve always been a bit of a control freak, which comes into play when I’m working on a song. I aim to be as involved as possible in the production process. Being physically in the room and having a present voice with the producer allows us to come up with new and original ideas that are the most authentic to the song and I. 

You’ve achieved so much already that it’s unbelievable you’re only 15. What are some goals you want to reach in the future?

My main ambition is to do live events. I’ll be announcing some big news in that department very shortly.

How do you feel you’ve grown as an artist and person since debuting with “Cookie Dough” in 2020?

Because of my development and growth, I believe my sound has evolved dramatically. In life and via music, I’m still figuring myself out. I write about what I’m experiencing and what’s relevant to me right now, and that looks a lot different today than it did when I was 13 and wrote “Cookie Dough.”  I’m sure my music will change many times throughout the course of time; it’s exciting to me.

We at TREMG love getting to know new artists who haven’t gotten the success or attention they deserve. Who are some of your favorite underrated artists at the moment?

I re-released “Black Coffee” with the help of an artist named OCTAVIO the Dweeb. He’s amazing, and I strongly advise you to check him out. You should also check out Joan, who I met at an event. Their music is lovely, and they are both highly remarkable on and off stage. I really enjoyed seeing them live and I believe they are going on tour soon. 

What can your fans look forward to in the rest of 2022?

As previously said, my greatest ambition and dream was to play live… I can’t say much more than that, but this dream may or may not come true in the coming year. 

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Madison Murray View All →

Hi! I’m Madison Murray, a pop culture and music writer who also loves writing about lifestyle and fashion. I have credits on sites like TREMG, The Honey POP, Genius, Young Hollywood, and Audible Addixion, as well as my own Melodic Musings blog. Find me on socials @madisonmwrites!

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