Forrest Isn’t Dead Faces Reinvention On Debut Album ‘The End Of Everything’

Sometimes the moments where we feel dead inside are really the moments where we’re redefining the life we want to live and subconsciously making strides towards living that life. Rising alt superstar Forrest Isn’t Dead understands that perhaps better than anyone, and his debut album, The End Of Everything, touches on those transitory periods with both eloquence and edge. Over the course of twelve songs, Forrest shows off a stunningly complex view of how what we go through shapes who we are as people, kicking off right from opening track “The Funeral.”

“I had that [theme] in my mind from the very beginning,” Forrest tells TREMG. “I initially wanted to name the album Life, Death, and The In-Between to discuss my personal experience with growing as a person through the hell I have put myself through.”

(c) Madison Records

The End Of Everything is equally morbid and light in a similar vein to The Cure’s unique blend of punk and pop, touching on his deepest thoughts while seeing him ascend with a more hopeful viewpoint that challenges him to evolve. A particular standout is “Deputy Bones,” which balances darker imagery with a moving self-awareness, seeing him reflect on what he’s been through and seeing where he can improve for the future, even though “it’s a long road out of Hell.”

“My favorite lyrics [on the project] are from my song ‘Deputy Bones’ and it’s the opening lines,” Forrest shares. “‘It’s beautiful yet haunting like this bloody blade. Life can be confusing, I’m plunging for the end. Every cut reminds me, so how could I forget? All the loving injuries and being left for dead.’” 

Whether you relate to Forrest’s own circumstances or your struggles are a little different, there’s undoubtedly something on this album that will resonate with you. Every line feels like a friend is confiding in you about something they’re going through – The End Of Everything doesn’t come off as an album, it comes off as an experience. It’s powerful, it’s thought-provoking, and it’s unifying.

“We wanted to create a space for people to feel open with their emotions,” he explains. “That way they can approach us and talk to us if they feel they don’t have someone in their own lives to do so with. We want to have an open community with our fans.”

This record is just the beginning for Forrest’s community, which will definitely skyrocket in numbers thanks to these mind-blowing new tracks. You can check out The End Of Everything on your favorite streaming services now, and get to know Forrest Isn’t Dead on Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, Twitter, and his website! Keep reading for more from our conversation with this introspective artist. 

(c) 300

Congratulations on your debut album, The End Of Everything! How does it feel to finally share the album with the world?

It feels great! Very thankful to finally be at this stage of this process. We have put a lot of time and effort into putting this together. 

How did you know that now was the right time to release your debut album?

We kind of picked the date because it’s the day before my birthday! Also so that we would have less competition with our freshman release with all the releases that happen in the spring. 

The project kicks off with the electric “The Funeral,” which sees you facing a metaphorical death. What made you choose “The Funeral” as the opening track?

It sets the tone for the rest of the album and is the beginning of the story with the figurative death of our character who is trying to change and strive through the hell they have been put into. 

The demo of “Here We Are” was the first song you sent to streaming services back in 2019, and now the final version gets a home on The End Of Everything! How do you feel you’ve grown as an artist since releasing that demo?

I feel like we have fully locked in on our branding and imagery and I have a full understanding of my direction and wants as an artist. 

Songs like “Earth” and “Drowning” have really poignant lyrics that nail down a certain emotion so well, and it really speaks to whoever’s listening. Are there a few lyrics on the project that you’re especially proud of?

My favorite lyrics are from my song “Deputy Bones” and it’s the opening lines – “It’s beautiful yet haunting like this bloody blade. Life can be confusing, I’m plunging for the end. Every cut reminds me, so how could I forget? All the loving injuries and being left for dead.” 

Speaking of “Earth,” you made a music video for the track that ties into the music video for “Heaven.” Were those songs always connected to you, or did you realize the connections later on?

They were actually the first two songs for the album, so it just kind of happened that way. 

Which song on The End Of Everything means the most to you and why?

“Deputy Bones” because I wrote it about the child abuse I endured, as well as the suicidal feelings I had as an adolescent alongside almost dying in my teenage years. It’s a very personal song for me. 

Which songs on The End Of Everything took the most and least time to make?

“Heaven” probably took the most time, although the idea initially came together very quickly. “Deputy Bones” was actually the fastest. 

One of the big themes on The End Of Everything is becoming a better person and finding a fresh beginning. Was there a certain moment when you realized you got to that point, and how did you get there?

I had that in my mind from the very beginning. I initially wanted to name the album Life, Death, and The In-Between to discuss my personal experience with growing as a person through the hell I have put myself through. 

You count artists like My Chemical Romance, Prince, and The Cure as some of your biggest influences. Is there a certain song or album by each of those artists that has particularly impacted you?

Three Cheers [For Sweet Revenge] by MCR, Wish and Pornography by The Cure, and Prince as a whole. All of these things have played a big role in shaping me as an artist and a person. 

For anyone who isn’t familiar with your music already, which of your songs would you recommend to them to get a feel for who you are as an artist?

Really depends on what they’re looking to get out of the music they listen to. If you want to dance around, listen to “Fire.” If you want to reflect, listen to “Here We Are” or “Heaven.” If you’re missing someone, listen to “The Light.” And if you live in a constant state of anxiety as I do, listen to “Paper Kingdom.” 

We at TREMG love getting to know new artists who haven’t gotten the success or attention they deserve. Who are some of your favorite underrated artists at the moment?

Iceage and Luxx. Both those bands are fucking sick and deserve way more attention than what they get. 

What can your fans look forward to in the rest of 2022?

A bunch of shows and the progress on our second album. 

Is there anything else you’d like to mention that the questions didn’t touch on?

Not really outside of the fact that we wanted to create a space for people to feel open with their emotions. That way they can approach us and talk to us if they feel they don’t have someone in their own lives to do so with. We want to have an open community with our fans.

One response to “Forrest Isn’t Dead Faces Reinvention On Debut Album ‘The End Of Everything’”

  1. […] like never before. Throughout September, we got to talk to incredible artists like Stolengoods, Forrest Isn’t Dead, and MIA GLADSTONE about their new projects, but there’s a whole world of talent making their own […]

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